The Music Teacher

January 20, 2016 at 2:24 pm 46 comments

For Friday Fictioneers 100-Word Challenge: 22 January 2016

Jan W. Fields
Photo Credit: Jan W. Fields

It was late in the afternoon when Azad arrived at their family home in the village. His mother was at the piano oblivious to the impending invasion of rebel forces. As the neighboring village fell, it was just a matter of time.

“Mama, I’m taking you with me,” he said to his widowed mother who was living alone. “You’re not safe here anymore.”

“What about my music students? Who will teach them when I’m gone? You should move back with your wife and children instead.“

“But Mama…”

Despondent, Azad left unable to persuade his mother. He never saw her again.

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46 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Joy Pixley  |  January 20, 2016 at 3:41 pm

    How sad! Sounds like Azad should have learned to be more insistent before this.

    (Also, shouldn’t it be “left without _his_ mother”?)

    Reply
    • 2. plaridel  |  January 20, 2016 at 4:47 pm

      joy:

      stand corrected. good catch. thanks for watching over my shoulders. 🙂

      Reply
  • 3. ansumani  |  January 20, 2016 at 6:53 pm

    Who knows…this could be a real story somewhere in the world at some time. Sad story – well told.

    Reply
    • 4. plaridel  |  January 21, 2016 at 10:07 am

      ansumani:

      yes, it’ll remain true for as long as there’s war.

      Reply
  • 5. maria  |  January 20, 2016 at 9:10 pm

    How sad and heartfelt. Her mother’s love for music and her students is commendable. 🙂

    Reply
    • 6. plaridel  |  January 21, 2016 at 10:07 am

      maria:

      her son knew it and grudgingly had to accept it.

      Reply
  • 7. Lynda  |  January 20, 2016 at 10:36 pm

    This is sad and well written. It reads like real life.

    Reply
    • 8. plaridel  |  January 21, 2016 at 10:07 am

      lynda:

      real life could be truer than fiction.

      Reply
  • 9. FabricatingFiction  |  January 21, 2016 at 1:20 am

    Oh! I was so hoping she’d go with him.

    Reply
    • 10. plaridel  |  January 21, 2016 at 10:06 am

      louise:

      for better or worse, the son had to respect her decision.

      Reply
  • 13. Sandra  |  January 21, 2016 at 1:56 am

    Such dedication. Nicely done.

    Reply
    • 14. plaridel  |  January 21, 2016 at 10:06 am

      sandra:

      it was her life. take it and she was good as dead.

      Reply
  • 15. rochellewisoff  |  January 21, 2016 at 4:42 am

    Dear Plaridel,

    This is such a heart-breaker and you wrote it well.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Reply
    • 16. plaridel  |  January 21, 2016 at 10:06 am

      rochelle:

      thank you. i’m glad you liked it. 🙂

      Reply
  • 17. gahlearner  |  January 21, 2016 at 5:04 am

    Very sad story, and I’m afraid true, too.

    Reply
    • 18. plaridel  |  January 21, 2016 at 10:05 am

      gahlearner:

      somewhere in the world it could be true.

      Reply
  • 19. aliciajamtaas  |  January 21, 2016 at 11:01 am

    A heart-warming yet sad take on the prompt. Well done.

    Reply
    • 20. plaridel  |  January 22, 2016 at 3:16 pm

      alicia:

      thank you for reading as usual.

      Reply
  • 21. Perry Block (@PerryBlock)  |  January 21, 2016 at 7:16 pm

    Music for her was life. In a way, not sad at all.

    Reply
    • 22. plaridel  |  January 22, 2016 at 3:17 pm

      perry:

      that’s one way of looking at it.

      Reply
  • 23. Amy Reese  |  January 21, 2016 at 8:54 pm

    She stayed for her students and for the music they shared. A very passionate story, Plaridel. Nicely done.

    Reply
    • 24. plaridel  |  January 22, 2016 at 3:17 pm

      amy:

      she did what she knew was best.

      Reply
  • 25. draliman  |  January 22, 2016 at 1:57 am

    Very sad, but such great commitment to her music and her students.

    Reply
    • 26. plaridel  |  January 22, 2016 at 3:18 pm

      draliman:

      for her dedication, she paid the ultimate sacrifice.

      Reply
  • 27. lifeconfusions  |  January 22, 2016 at 3:00 am

    Although sad, but her passion probably made it worth staying there….
    Beautifully penned Plaridel 🙂

    Reply
    • 28. plaridel  |  January 22, 2016 at 3:18 pm

      zee:

      he had to do what she had to do for her students.

      Reply
  • 29. Keith's Ramblings  |  January 22, 2016 at 4:49 am

    What a sorrowful tale. Beautifully written.

    Visit Keith’s Ramblings!

    Reply
    • 30. plaridel  |  January 22, 2016 at 3:18 pm

      keith:

      thank you. deeply appreciated.

      Reply
  • 31. Dale  |  January 22, 2016 at 8:07 am

    Such a heartbreaking story that is too real…

    Reply
    • 32. plaridel  |  January 22, 2016 at 3:19 pm

      dale:

      it happens somewhere in the world more often than we realize.

      Reply
      • 33. Dale  |  January 22, 2016 at 5:37 pm

        sadly…

        Reply
        • 34. plaridel  |  January 24, 2016 at 2:00 pm

          dale:

          i know. 😦

          Reply
  • 35. Björn Rudberg (brudberg)  |  January 22, 2016 at 11:30 am

    A story too often repeated. The world is never kind to those with the call from others…

    Reply
    • 36. plaridel  |  January 22, 2016 at 3:20 pm

      björn:

      war is hell.

      Reply
  • 37. Checkii  |  January 22, 2016 at 12:34 pm

    Very well written and engaging too…as though it were playing before me.

    Reply
    • 38. plaridel  |  January 22, 2016 at 3:20 pm

      checkii:

      thank you. i deeply appreciate your comment.

      Reply
  • 39. rgayer55  |  January 22, 2016 at 2:22 pm

    Hopefully, her sweet notes soothed the savage rebel’s hearts.

    Reply
    • 40. plaridel  |  January 22, 2016 at 3:21 pm

      russell:

      we could only hope.

      Reply
  • 41. Margaret  |  January 24, 2016 at 5:32 pm

    So tragic. Music was her whole world, I guess. Beautifully portrayed.

    Reply
    • 42. plaridel  |  January 25, 2016 at 9:43 am

      margaret:

      thank you for the kind words.

      Reply
  • 43. patriciaruthsusan  |  January 26, 2016 at 8:26 am

    How sad but it has a realistic quality. I feel sure things like that are actually happening or have happened. He couldn’t be responsible if his mother just refused. You can’t change some people no matter how much you love them. She was living in her own world. Well done, Plaridel. —- Suzanne

    Reply
    • 44. plaridel  |  January 26, 2016 at 10:07 am

      suzanne:

      in a movie, i remember somebody saying that the ancient greeks never wrote obituaries. when a person died, they only asked if he had passion. it was obvious that her mother had passion worth dying for.

      Reply
  • 45. Dreamer of Dreams  |  January 26, 2016 at 8:47 am

    “Azad” means “freedom.”
    What a story!
    Beautifully told. Feels like it’s taking place in Afghanistan, just before the Russians.

    Reply
    • 46. plaridel  |  January 26, 2016 at 10:07 am

      vijaya:

      your hindsight is amazing. when i wrote the story, i was thinking of a place close to the border.

      Reply

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