The Pigeon Lady

May 4, 2016 at 7:19 pm 40 comments

For Friday Fictioneers 100-Word Challenge: 6 May 2016

Roger Bultot
Photo Credit: Roger Bultot

It was her custom to walk around main street and feed the birds with bread crumbs. The local paper called her the pigeon lady.

She was Asian and about five-foot tall. She was in her 70s with deep lines surrounding her face. She had the nón lá conical hat that peasants wore in her native country. She had two bundles containing her possessions placed on both ends of a pole resting on her shoulder.

On the day she died, as if to mourn her passing, a flock of pigeons were seen perched motionless on telephone lines against a darkening sky.

Revision #1 (5/7/2016)

It was her custom to walk around main street and feed the homeless birds with bread crumbs. The local paper called her the pigeon lady.

She was Asian and about five-foot tall. In her early 70s, deep lines surrounded her face. Sporting a nón lá conical hat worn by peasants in her native country, the woman carried two bundles containing her possessions placed on both ends of a pole resting on her right shoulder.

On the day she died, as if to mourn her passing, a flock of pigeons were seen perched motionless on telephone lines against a darkening sky.

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Entry filed under: Blogroll, friday fictioneers. Tags: , .

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40 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Dreamer of Dreams  |  May 4, 2016 at 10:24 pm

    A moving and lyrical story. Beautiful, Plaridel!

    Reply
    • 2. plaridel  |  May 5, 2016 at 9:05 am

      vijaya:

      it was based on a true story.

      Reply
      • 3. Dreamer of Dreams  |  May 5, 2016 at 10:23 am

        Then, it’s even more poignant, and your writing is a fitting tribute!

        Reply
        • 4. plaridel  |  May 6, 2016 at 10:01 am

          vijaya:

          thank you.

          Reply
  • 5. draliman  |  May 5, 2016 at 2:48 am

    A nice idea, the pigeons sitting in mourning of their lost friend.

    Reply
    • 6. plaridel  |  May 5, 2016 at 9:05 am

      draliman:

      i just hope they really did.

      Reply
  • 7. FabricatingFiction  |  May 5, 2016 at 8:15 am

    I could really picture her. Great description.

    Reply
    • 8. plaridel  |  May 5, 2016 at 9:04 am

      louise:

      the real pigeon lady used to be a feature in our town until she died or social services finally caught up with her.

      Reply
  • 9. maria  |  May 6, 2016 at 3:37 am

    Brilliant take. Who says only human could feel sadness? Lovely words, Plaridel. 🙂

    Reply
    • 10. plaridel  |  May 6, 2016 at 10:00 am

      maria:

      i’m glad you liked it. thank you.

      Reply
      • 11. maria  |  May 7, 2016 at 8:31 am

        My pleasure. 🙂

        Reply
        • 12. plaridel  |  May 7, 2016 at 9:03 am

          maria:

          awesome. 🙂

          Reply
  • 13. wmqcolby  |  May 6, 2016 at 4:24 am

    Ah, very nice, Plaridel. I could really see this lady. Decent ending. Was she a real person in real life or a made-up person? Whichever, it’s a good piece of writing. Super!

    Reply
    • 14. plaridel  |  May 6, 2016 at 10:00 am

      kent:

      she was a real person that i used to see in our main boulevard. thank you.

      Reply
      • 15. wmqcolby  |  May 6, 2016 at 10:08 am

        Sweet! You nailed it!

        Reply
        • 16. plaridel  |  May 6, 2016 at 2:03 pm

          kent:

          thank you.

          Reply
  • 17. ansumani  |  May 6, 2016 at 7:28 am

    There is a parrot man in my hometown back in India who feeds hundreds of parrots. The pictures of these colorful winged creatures flocking to his rooftop was amazing. I can feel the birds sorrow in your story. Nicely done.

    Reply
    • 18. plaridel  |  May 6, 2016 at 9:59 am

      ansumani:

      looking at the picture prompt made me remember this lady. she was gone now. the last time i saw her was three years ago.

      Reply
  • 19. gahlearner  |  May 6, 2016 at 1:17 pm

    Sad and beautiful story. I’m sure the birds miss her.

    Reply
    • 20. plaridel  |  May 6, 2016 at 2:03 pm

      gahlearner:

      i think you’re right.

      Reply
  • 21. rgayer55  |  May 6, 2016 at 1:28 pm

    People like her add richness to the fabric of our lives. I think she’d be pleased if she read this story.

    Reply
    • 22. plaridel  |  May 6, 2016 at 2:04 pm

      russell:

      she didn’t understand english. she was also suffering from dementia. the last time i saw her three years ago, she was talking to herself.

      Reply
      • 23. rgayer55  |  May 9, 2016 at 7:07 am

        They say it’s okay to talk to yourself. It’s when you start saying, Huh?” that there’s a real problem. 🙂

        Reply
        • 24. plaridel  |  May 10, 2016 at 1:47 pm

          russell:

          i’ve been observed doing that in front of the computer. 🙂

          Reply
  • 25. Mike  |  May 6, 2016 at 3:14 pm

    That’s just how it should be, care and be cared for. Like. Mike

    Reply
    • 26. plaridel  |  May 7, 2016 at 9:05 am

      mike:

      thank you for reading. deeply appreciated it.

      Reply
  • 27. Amy Reese  |  May 6, 2016 at 9:31 pm

    Very poignant take. I bet the pigeons did miss her, truly. She had made an impact on their lives. Beautiful story, Plaridel.

    Reply
    • 28. plaridel  |  May 7, 2016 at 9:20 am

      amy:

      the pigeons lost their advocate indeed.

      Reply
  • 29. mickwynn2013  |  May 7, 2016 at 1:40 am

    Lovely imagery and idea well portrayed

    Reply
    • 30. plaridel  |  May 7, 2016 at 9:21 am

      mick:

      thank you. i’m glad you liked it. i did make some changes based on rochelle’s suggestions. 🙂

      Reply
  • 31. subroto  |  May 7, 2016 at 2:40 am

    Lovely story indeed, there are so many things unexplained in nature.

    Reply
    • 32. plaridel  |  May 7, 2016 at 9:22 am

      subroto:

      i totally agree.

      Reply
  • 33. rochellewisoff  |  May 7, 2016 at 4:41 am

    Dear Plaridel,

    A sweet story, made sweeter by fact. One tiny word of crit. Four sentences beginning with ‘She’ is kind of redundant. I wouldn’t change it in this story, but I’d take it under consideration in other writings. Nonetheless a beautifully told story.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Reply
    • 34. plaridel  |  May 7, 2016 at 9:02 am

      rochelle:

      i did a quick fix based on your comments which i deeply appreciated. thank you.

      Reply
  • 35. Sandra  |  May 7, 2016 at 9:32 am

    Rochelle echoed my sentiments. Nice story.

    Reply
    • 36. plaridel  |  May 7, 2016 at 9:02 pm

      sandra:

      thank you. it means a lot that somebody watches my back. 🙂

      Reply
  • 37. Björn Rudberg (brudberg)  |  May 7, 2016 at 12:17 pm

    There is such a mystery and sadness on that old lady and her bond to those pigeons.

    Reply
    • 38. plaridel  |  May 7, 2016 at 9:05 pm

      björn:

      i guess it made her happy. that made all the difference.

      Reply
  • 39. patriciaruthsusan  |  May 10, 2016 at 1:46 pm

    Heartwarming story, Plaridel. It sounds real. I could see her. Well done. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Reply
    • 40. plaridel  |  May 10, 2016 at 2:32 pm

      suzanne:

      i’m glad you liked the story. 🙂

      Reply

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