Better Late Than Never

February 16, 2017 at 5:11 pm 26 comments

For Friday Fictioneers 100-Word Challenge: 17 February 2017

Liz Young

Photo Credit: Liz Young

Aelius named the stucco-coated limestone bust, Camilla, after the rich merchant’s youngest daughter who commissioned it. Almost blind due to old age, the sculptor couldn’t see the obvious little imperfections. Rejected by the merchant, Aelius knew that Camilla would stand the test of time.

Many centuries later, archaeologists digging in the ancient site of Pompeii found Camilla among the ruins. Protected from the elements under tons of volcanic ash, it was almost intact except for a broken nose.

It came a little late, but Aelius was right. Displayed prominently in the antiquity museum, Camilla finally got the recognition it deserved.

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Blogroll, friday fictioneers. Tags: , .

Broken Weekly Photo Challenge: Against the Odds

26 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Dale  |  February 16, 2017 at 6:05 pm

    Lovely second submission, Plaridel! (Got an extra “l” in your title) 🙂

    Reply
    • 2. plaridel  |  February 16, 2017 at 6:22 pm

      dale:

      oops! thanks for noticing it. corrected as we speak. 🙂

      Reply
      • 3. Dale  |  February 16, 2017 at 6:22 pm

        That’s what friends are for!

        Reply
        • 4. plaridel  |  February 16, 2017 at 9:37 pm

          dale:

          glad to have you watching my back. 🙂

          Reply
  • 5. handmadejewelryhaven  |  February 16, 2017 at 7:06 pm

    I sometimes wonder what the people in the future will find from our lifetime.
    Great story.

    – Lisa

    Reply
    • 6. plaridel  |  February 16, 2017 at 9:51 pm

      lisa:

      we live in the digital world. we can provide them with lots of information stored in electronic media. we just need to be sure that they can access them. 🙂

      Reply
  • 7. Liz Young  |  February 17, 2017 at 1:46 am

    Fame at last! Well written take on my photo.

    Reply
    • 8. plaridel  |  February 17, 2017 at 2:04 pm

      liz:

      thank you for the inspiring photo. 🙂

      Reply
  • 9. rochellewisoff  |  February 17, 2017 at 2:47 am

    Dear Plaridel,

    I thought I’d read one from you already. 😉 Now we know the true story. Nicely done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Reply
    • 10. plaridel  |  February 17, 2017 at 2:04 pm

      rochelle:

      i couldn’t resist writing a second one this week. 🙂

      Reply
  • 11. Kecia Sparlin  |  February 17, 2017 at 5:28 am

    I like this reference to ancient statues. It’s a shame how many lost their noses. Nice take this week.

    Reply
    • 12. plaridel  |  February 17, 2017 at 2:04 pm

      kecia:

      i agree. incidentally, most of them were caused by the early christians.

      Reply
  • 13. Leigh W. Smith  |  February 17, 2017 at 6:08 am

    Good one, Plaridel. I love the history tie-in to this futuristic story. And ha, I’d not even noticed Camilla was missing a nose until your story mentioned it.

    Reply
    • 14. plaridel  |  February 17, 2017 at 2:03 pm

      leigh:

      thank you. i deeply appreciate your comment.

      Reply
  • 15. Mike  |  February 17, 2017 at 9:57 am

    The face does have an element of Greek tragedy about it – unlike your story which I thought was great.

    Reply
    • 16. plaridel  |  February 17, 2017 at 2:03 pm

      mike:

      thank you for the wonderful comment. 🙂

      Reply
  • 17. Michael Wynn  |  February 18, 2017 at 2:43 am

    Another good one. I like the idea of describing an antiquity’s back story. Often, it starts for us with, “this was discovered…”

    Reply
    • 18. plaridel  |  February 18, 2017 at 2:36 pm

      mick:

      as i was looking at my pompeii photos, something popped up. i couldn’t resist writing a second one this week

      Reply
  • 19. neelwritesblog  |  February 18, 2017 at 3:40 am

    What an antique piece of story. You are a gifted writer, Plaridel

    Reply
    • 20. plaridel  |  February 18, 2017 at 2:36 pm

      neel:

      thank you for the encouragement. deeply appreciated.

      Reply
  • 21. Keigh Ahr  |  February 18, 2017 at 1:45 pm

    Historical irony — like it

    Reply
    • 22. plaridel  |  February 18, 2017 at 2:35 pm

      keigh:

      you’re very kind. thank you.

      Reply
  • 23. rgayer55  |  February 20, 2017 at 3:54 am

    It made me wonder how many famous works of art weren’t considered masterpieces until centuries later?

    Reply
    • 24. plaridel  |  February 20, 2017 at 10:23 am

      russell:

      it seems to me that time has a way of smoothen out the imperfections.
      it’s either that or people’s taste change.

      Reply
  • 25. Snow's Fissures and Fractures  |  February 21, 2017 at 2:04 pm

    This is such a beatufil story, nicely done!

    Reply
    • 26. plaridel  |  February 21, 2017 at 4:55 pm

      lora:

      i’m glad you liked it. thank you for reading.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


From The Book Thief

i have hated the words and i have loved them, and i hope i have made them right.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,798 other followers

Right Brain vs. Left Brain Test

In My Community

Recent Posts

Blog Stats

  • 100,010 hits
Flag Counter

%d bloggers like this: